Another Study Questions US Nutritional Recommendations

ImageFindings from the most recent review comparing the effects of fatty acids on heart disease do not agree with the current US nutritional recommendations. Current recommendations encourage replacing saturated fat intake with monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats to reduce heart disease risk. The meta-analysis, published in the Annals of Internal Medicine, finds no association of saturated fat intake with heart disease.  Continue reading

Does Egg Consumption Increase Risk for Developing Heart Disease?

ImageAfter a colleague asked my opinion on the relationship between egg consumption and cardiovascular disease, I decided to delve further into the topic.

For decades, we’ve been advised to limit egg consumption to reduce our risk of developing heart disease. The reasoning for this is based on the diet-heart hypothesis, which argues eating foods rich in cholesterol and saturated fat increases risk of developing heart disease. Specifically applied to eggs, the argument states: 1) eggs are rich in cholesterol; 2) eating cholesterol has been shown, in some studies, to increase serum cholesterol; 3) high serum cholesterol promotes heart disease. Using this logic, populations with increased egg consumption should have increased rates of heart disease.  Continue reading

Mediterranean Diet Reduces Heart Disease Risk; Low-Fat Diet is Difficult to Study

ImageA research article published in The New England Journal of Medicine on February 25, 2013 found that a traditional Mediterranean diet reduced risk of major cardiovascular events compared to a low-fat diet. The study suggested that a Mediterranean diet — rich in olive oil, nuts, beans, fish, fruits and vegetables — is healthier than a typical western diet. The study also demonstrated the challenges of conducting clinical research trials on diet.  Continue reading